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Six Ways to Recognize Others More Often
Behavioral statistician Joseph Folkman contends that recognition is a powerful tool. But while not difficult to utilize, some leaders are much better at showing appreciation than others. With that in mind, he offers six straight-forward suggestions for how to improve one’s ability to recognize others. First, train yourself to take note of people doing things the right way. Most of us have been conditioned to do the opposite, and focus on what we see as “wrong.” A better way to manage, Folkman says, is to notice and recognize people when they do something well. Second, recognize the effort and hard work that went into the effort or the project. “Everyone can always try harder, but they can’t always be smarter,” he points out. Three, do a better job of noticing progress, and learn to recognize others when you see increased effort or improvements.

Four, be sure to say “thank you” more often. Being grateful for exceptional service is worth it simply because it increases the probability you will get more great service when you do, according to Folkman. As they say in the theater world: If you want a great performance, be a great audience. Five, make more positive emotional connections. Every interaction has the possibility of being positive, negative or neutral. So look for even the smallest opportunities to make more positive emotional connections each day. Sometimes it can be as simple as just smiling at someone else. Finally, take the time to reflect on who has impacted your life on any given day. This will help you notice others that deserve recognition.
Forbes (11/24/15) Folkman, Joseph
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MARCH 2016 EDITION
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